Dose-response Tools

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9 record(s) found




ID Author(s) Title / Description Publication Year
10234 Environmental Protection Agency

Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS)
Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/ncea/bmds/

EPA has released the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) Version 2.1.2, a tool which is used to facilitate the application of benchmark dose (BMD) methods to EPA hazardous pollutant risk assessments.

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Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Keywords:

computer software, dosage, dose response, environmental protection, Environmental Protection Agency, pollutants, risk assessment

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9613 Williams, D., et al

Risk of Fetal Mortality After Exposure to Listeria monocytogenes Based on Dose-Response Data from Pregnant Guinea Pigs and Primates
Risk of Fetal Mortality After Exposure to Listeria monocytogenes Based on Dose-Response Data from Pregnant Guinea Pigs and Primates
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2009.01308.x

Recent animal studies using nonhuman primates and guinea pigs have both estimated LD50s of approximately 107Listeria monocytogenescolony forming units (cfu). The FAO/WHO estimated a human LD50 of 1.9 106…

Recent animal studies using nonhuman primates and guinea pigs have both estimated LD50s of approximately 107 Listeria monocytogenes colony forming units (cfu). The FAO/WHO estimated a human LD50 of 1.9 × 106 cfu based on data from a pregnant woman consuming contaminated soft cheese. The researchers reevaluated risk based on dose-response curves from pregnant rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. Using standard risk assessment methodology including hazard identification, exposure assessment, hazard characterization, and risk characterization, risk was calculated based on the new dose-response information. To compare models, researchers looked at mortality rate per serving at predicted doses ranging from 10−4 to 1012 L. monocytogenes cfu. 

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 29, No. 11, Nov. 2009, p. 1495–1505.

Keywords:

bacteria, dairy products, dose response, Listeria, Listeria monocytogenes, microbiological risk assessment, models, pregnant women, risk assessment, soft cheeses

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20091100
2009
9579 OpenEpi

Open Source Epidemiologic Statistics for Public Health
Open Source Epidemiologic Statistics for Public Health
URL: http://www.openepi.com/OE2.3/Menu/OpenEpiMenu.htm

OpenEpi is free and open source software for epidemiologic statistics. It can be run from a web server or downloaded and run without a web connection. A server is…

OpenEpi is free and open source software for epidemiologic statistics. It can be run from a web server or downloaded and run without a web connection. A server is not required. OpenEpi provides statistics for counts and measurements in descriptive and analytic studies, stratified analysis with exact confidence limits, matched pair and person-time analysis, sample size and power calculations, random numbers, sensitivity, specificity and other evaluation statistics, R x C tables, chi-square for dose-response, and links to other useful sites.

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Source: OpenEpi

Keywords:

computer software, dose response, epidemiology, public health, statistical models, statistics

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9319 Vicari, A., et al

Second-Order Modeling of Variability and Uncertainty in Microbial Hazard Characterization
Second-Order Modeling of Variability and Uncertainty in Microbial Hazard Characterization
URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iafp/jfp/2007/00000070/00000002/art00013

This study describes an analytical framework that permits quantitative consideration of variability and uncertainty in microbial hazard characterization. Second-order modeling that used two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation and stratification into…

This study describes an analytical framework that permits quantitative consideration of variability and uncertainty in microbial hazard characterization. Second-order modeling that used two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation and stratification into homogeneous population subgroups was applied to integrate uncertainty and variability.  

The results indicate that uncertainty associated with dose-response modeling has a dominating influence on the analytical outcome. In contrast, inclusion of the age factor has a limited impact. While the advocacy of more closely modeling variability in hazard characterization is warranted, the characterization of key sources of uncertainties and their consistent propagation throughout a microbial risk assessment actually appear of greater importance.

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Source: Journal of Food Protection

Keywords:

biological hazards, Campylobacter jejuni, dose response, hazard characterization, methodology, microbiological risk assessment, models, Monte Carlo method, risk assessment, uncertainty, variability

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20070200
2007
9298 Tamrakar, S.B.; Haluska, A.; Haas, C.N.; Bartrand, T.A.

Dose-Response Model of Coxiella burnetii (Q Fever)
Dose-Response Model of Coxiella burnetii (Q Fever)
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2010.01466.x

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the intracellular gram-negative bacteriumCoxiella burnetii(C. burnetii), which only multiplies within the phagolysosomal vacuoles. Q fever may manifest as acute or chronic…

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the intracellular gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii), which only multiplies within the phagolysosomal vacuoles. Q fever may manifest as acute or chronic disease. The acute form is generally not fatal and manifestes as self-controlled febrile illness. Chronic Q fever is usually characterized by endocarditis. Many animal models, including humans, have been studied for Q fever infection through various exposure routes. The studies considered different endpoints including death for animal models and clinical signs for human infection. In this article, animal experimental data available in the open literature were fit to suitable dose-response models using maximum likelihood estimation. 

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 31, No. 1, Jan. 2011, p. 120–8.

Keywords:

Coxiella burnetii, dose response, models, Q fever

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20110100
2011
9286 Williams, M.S.; Ebel, E.D.; Vose, D.

Methodology for Determining the Appropriateness of a Linear Dose-Response Function
Methodology for Determining the Appropriateness of a Linear Dose-Response Function
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2010.01518.x

Microbial food safety risk assessment models can often at times be simplified by eliminating the need to integrate a complex dose-response relationship across a distribution of exposure doses. This…

Microbial food safety risk assessment models can often at times be simplified by eliminating the need to integrate a complex dose-response relationship across a distribution of exposure doses. This is possible if exposure pathways lead to pathogens at exposure that consistently have a small probability of causing illness. In this situation, the probability of illness will follow an approximately linear function of dose. This article discusses a methodology for how to determine if a linear dose-response is in fact appropriate. 

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 31, No. 3, Mar. 2011, p. 345–50.

Keywords:

dose response, methodology, microbiological risk assessment, models, risk assessment

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20110300
2011
9233 World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety

Risk Assessment Toolkit
Risk Assessment Toolkit
URL: http://www.who.int/ipcs/methods/harmonization/areas/ra_toolkit/en/index.html

The WHO/IPCS Risk Assessment Toolkit (RA Toolkit) project aims to make the international tools on chemical risk assessment more readily accessible, especially to relevant stakeholders in developing countries and…

The WHO/IPCS Risk Assessment Toolkit (RA Toolkit) project aims to make the international tools on chemical risk assessment more readily accessible, especially to relevant stakeholders in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.

This website includes records of the meeting introducing the pilot phase of the draft WHO Risk Assessment Toolkit in Thailand, Malaysia and China (Bangkok meeting, July 2009).

The RA Toolkit is organized into sections that provide:

-An overview of chemical RA, including the RA framework and uses of RA;

-Generic road maps for how to conduct RA;

-Listing of international resources that are useful for conducting RAs; and

-Examples of how that information can be applied to a RA question, including case-specific roadmaps.

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Source: World Health Organization

Keywords:

methodology, risk assessment

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8949 Hack, C.E., et al

Bayesian Network Model for Biomarker-Based Dose Response
A Bayesian Network Model for Biomarker-Based Dose Response
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2010.01413.x

A Bayesian network model was developed to integrate diverse types of data to conduct an exposure-dose-response assessment for benzene-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The network approach was used to…

A Bayesian network model was developed to integrate diverse types of data to conduct an exposure-dose-response assessment for benzene-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The network approach was used to evaluate and compare individual biomarkers and quantitatively link the biomarkers along the exposure-disease continuum. The network was used to perform the biomarker-based dose-response analysis, and various other approaches to the dose-response analysis were conducted for comparison.

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 30, No. 7, Jul. 2010, p. 1037 - 1051

Keywords:

Bayesian theory, benzoic acid, biomarkers, Canada, carcinogens, dietary exposure, dose response, exposure, food intake, models, neoplasms

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20100700
2010
494 Sielken and Associates Consulting, Inc.

Software at Sielken and Associates
Software at Sielken and Associates
URL: http://www.sielkenassociates.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=1199

This page features a list of six different softwares offered by Sielken and Associates, including dose-response tools, exposure tools, statistical tools, and risk communication tools, among others.

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Source: Sielken and Associates Consulting, Inc.

Keywords:

computer software, dose response, exposure models, risk communication, simulation models, statistical models

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