Source Attribution

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19 record(s) found

ID Author(s) Title / Description Publication Year
10323 Hald, T.; Vose, D.; Wegener, H.C.; Koupeev, T. Bayesian Approach to Quantify the Contribution of Animal-Food Sources to Human Salmonellosis A Bayesian Approach to Quantify the Contribution of Animal-Food Sources to Human Salmonellosis
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0272-4332.2004.00427.x

Based on the data from the integrated Danish Salmonella surveillance in 1999, the researchers developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each of the major animal-food sources…

Based on the data from the integrated Danish Salmonella surveillance in 1999, the researchers developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each of the major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis. The model was set up to calculate the number of domestic and sporadic cases caused by different Salmonella sero and phage types as a function of the prevalence of these Salmonella types in the animal-food sources and the amount of food source consumed. 

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 1, Feb. 2004, p. 255–69.

Keywords:

Bayesian theory, Denmark, disease surveillance, food animals, mathematical models, monitoring, quantitative analysis, Salmonella, salmonellosis, source attribution

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20040200 2004
9922 Guo, C., et al Application of Bayesian Techniques to Model the Burden of Human Salmonellosis Attributable to U.S. Food Commodities at the Point of Processing: Adaptation of a Danish Model Application of Bayesian Techniques to Model the Burden of Human Salmonellosis Attributable to U.S. Food Commodities at the Point of Processing: Adaptation of a Danish Model
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2010.0714

Mathematical models that estimate the proportion of foodborne illnesses attributable to food commodities at specific points in the food chain may be useful to risk managers and policy makers…

Mathematical models that estimate the proportion of foodborne illnesses attributable to food commodities at specific points in the food chain may be useful to risk managers and policy makers to formulate public health goals, prioritize interventions, and document the effectiveness of mitigations aimed at reducing illness. Using human surveillance data on laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Salmonella testing data from U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service's regulatory programs, the researchers developed a point-of-processing foodborne illness attribution model by adapting the Hald Salmonella Bayesian source attribution model. Key model outputs include estimates of the relative proportions of domestically acquired sporadic human Salmonella infections resulting from contamination of raw meat, poultry, and egg products processed in the United States from 1998 through 2003. 

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Source: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, Vol. 8, No. 4, Apr. 2011, p. 509-16.

Keywords:

Bayesian theory, burden of disease, disease surveillance, egg products, eggs, food processing, foodborne illness, meat, models, Netherlands, poultry, Salmonella, salmonellosis, source attribution

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20110400 2011
9623 Batz, M.B., et al Attributing Illness to Food Attributing Illness to Food
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/NCIDOD/EID/vol11no07/04-0634.htm

The Food Safety Research Consortium sponsored the Food Attribution Data Workshop in October 2003 to discuss the virtues and limitations of these approaches and to identify future options for…

The Food Safety Research Consortium sponsored the Food Attribution Data Workshop in October 2003 to discuss the virtues and limitations of these approaches and to identify future options for collecting food attribution data in the United States. This article summarizes workshop discussions and identifies challenges that affect progress in this critical component of a risk-based approach to improving food safety.

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Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 7, Jul. 2005.

Keywords:

disease surveillance, food contamination, foodborne illness, risk analysis, source attribution

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20050700 2005
9621 National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency Microbial Source Tracking Guide Document Microbial Source Tracking Guide Document
URL: http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/600r05064/600r05064.pdf

The intent of this guide is to provide the reader with insight into various tools and approaches used to track sources of fecal contamination impacting water quality in streams,…

The intent of this guide is to provide the reader with insight into various tools and approaches used to track sources of fecal contamination impacting water quality in streams, rivers, lakes, and marine beaches. Descriptions of research and several case studies gathered through workshops, literature searches, and phone interviews are also provided. An effort was made to showcase programs, activities, and analyses that incorporated diverse Microbial Source Tracking (MST) approaches and tools.

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Source: National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency

Keywords:

biological hazards, food contamination, guidelines, research, source attribution, water, water quality, water resources

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20050600 2005
9499 Med Vet Net Methods of attributing human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections with different animals, food and environmental sources Methods of attributing human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections with different animals, food and environmental sources
URL: http://www.medvetnet.org/cms/templates/doc.php?id=60&searchstring=source%20attrib

This website includes annual reports for this Med Vet Net project on source attribution. To identify and prioritize effective food safety interventions, it is critical to attribute human zoonotic…

This website includes annual reports for this Med Vet Net project on source attribution. To identify and prioritize effective food safety interventions, it is critical to attribute human zoonotic infections to the sources responsible. A wide variety of approaches and data for source attribution are used around the world and in the process of priority setting, it is very important to understand the differences and limitations of these approaches.

The objective of this project was to apply, compare, discuss and recommend the appropriate use of four different approaches: microbial subtyping, risk (exposure) assessment, analytical epidemiology and outbreak inverstigations. Salmonella and Campylobacter are selected as cases.

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Source: Med Vet Net

Keywords:

animal health, Campylobacter, control methods, epidemiology, exposure assessment, methodology, microbiology, outbreak investigation, research projects, Salmonella, source attribution

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9498 European Food Safety Authority Overview of methods for source attribution for human illness from foodborne microbiological hazards Overview of methods for source attribution for human illness from foodborne microbiological hazards
URL: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/Scientific_Opinion/biohaz_op_ej764_source_attribution_en.pdf?ssbinary=true

This document provides an overview on the methods for source attribution for human illness from foodborne microbiological hazards. This report illustrates attribution of human illness through microbiological subtyping, using…

This document provides an overview on the methods for source attribution for human illness from foodborne microbiological hazards. This report illustrates attribution of human illness through microbiological subtyping, using summary outbreak data for source attribution, epidemiological studies for source attribution of sporadic cases, source attribution by comparative exposure or risk assessment and source attribution by expert elicitation. This reports concludes that the scientific and accurate attribution of foodborne illnesses to specific foods requires developing a comprehensive program that combines many of these methods. Such a system can be achieved with increased resources and cooperation among food safety institutions.

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Source: European Food Safety Authority

Keywords:

epidemiology, expert opinion, food pathogens, human health, methodology, microbiological risk assessment, outbreak investigation, risk assessment, source attribution

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20080709 2008
9497 Public Health Agency of Canada Source Attribution Source Attribution
URL: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/c-enternet/source-eng.php

This website provides a focus on sources and pathogens, methodological options and unique benefits of source attribution. Source attribution is described as the process of determining what proportion…

This website provides a focus on sources and pathogens, methodological options and unique benefits of source attribution.

Source attribution is described as the process of determining what proportion of a particular disease is acquired from a given source (e.g. chicken) and through a given pathway (e.g. food, water, person-to-person transmission).

This site explains that C-EnterNet, a comprehensive surveillance program in Canada, will approach source attribution mainly through the comparison of pathogen profiles (microbial source tracking).

C-EnterNet will focus on the pathogens known to have the greatest potential to cause enteric diseases, with particularly severe consequences for the youngest, oldest and immune-compromised members of the population.

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Source: Public Health Agency of Canada

Keywords:

burden of disease, disease surveillance, epidemiology, foodborne illness, methodology, monitoring, source attribution

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8877 French, N.; Molecular Epidemiology and Veterinary Public Health Group Enhancing Surveillance of Potentially Foodborne Enteric Diseases in New Zealand: Human Campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu: Project extension incorporating additional poultry sources Enhancing Surveillance of Potentially Foodborne Enteric Diseases in New Zealand: Human Campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu: Project extension incorporating additional poultry sources
URL: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/enhancing-surveillance-potentially-research-projects/index.htm

This report describes an extension of NZFSA-funded studies carried out between 2005 and 2008, and should be read in conjunction with the 2008 report "Enhancing surveillance of potentially foodborne…

This report describes an extension of NZFSA-funded studies carried out between 2005 and 2008, and should be read in conjunction with the 2008 report "Enhancing surveillance of potentially foodborne enteric diseases in New Zealand: Human campylobacteriosis inthe Manawatu."

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Source: New Zealand Food Safety Authority

Keywords:

Campylobacter, enterotoxins, foodborne illness, monitoring, poultry, poultry products

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20090900 2009
8874 French, N.; Marshall, J. Dynamic modelling of Campylobacter sources in the Manawatu Dynamic modelling of Campylobacter sources in the Manawatu
URL: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/dynamic-modelling-campylobacter-research-projects/dynamic-modelling-massey.pdf

In this paper, the authors summarize the application of extensions to the Hald, Dutch, and Island models for source attribution to the isolates from a sentinel collection site over…

In this paper, the authors summarize the application of extensions to the Hald, Dutch, and Island models for source attribution to the isolates from a sentinel collection site over a 4 year period, focusing on the temporal variation in the attribution through time.

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Source: New Zealand Food Safety Authority

Keywords:

bacteria, biological hazards, Campylobacter, Campylobacter jejuni, models, source attribution

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20090800 2009
8843 Pires, S.M.; Vigre, H.; Makela, P.; Hald, T. Using Outbreak Data for Source Attribution of Human Salmonellosis and Campylobacteriosis in Europe Using Outbreak Data for Source Attribution of Human Salmonellosis and Campylobacteriosis in Europe
URL: http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2010.0564

In this paper, the authors describe a method that is able to attribute human cases to specific food items contained in complex foods. The model is based on data…

In this paper, the authors describe a method that is able to attribute human cases to specific food items contained in complex foods. The model is based on data from investigations of Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks in the European Union in 2005 and 2006.

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Source: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, Vol. 7, No. 11, Nov. , 2010, p. 1351-61.

Keywords:

bacteria, biological hazards, Campylobacter, disease outbreaks, egg products, eggs, poultry, poultry products, Salmonella, source attribution

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20101102 2010
8715 French, N. Enhancing Surveillance of Potentially Foodborne Enteric Diseases in New Zealand: Human Campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu Enhancing Surveillance of Potentially Foodborne Enteric Diseases in New Zealand: Human Campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu
URL: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/enhancing-surveillance-potentially-research-projects-2/Campy_Attribution_Manawatu.pdf

Using the dataset from the Manawatu-cited study, several risk attribution models and risk research tools have been developed and used to assess the relative contribution of food and non-food…

Using the dataset from the Manawatu-cited study, several risk attribution models and risk research tools have been developed and used to assess the relative contribution of food and non-food sources to the burden of human disease.

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Source: New Zealand Food Safety Authority

Keywords:

bacteria, biological hazards, Campylobacter, foodborne illness, monitoring, New Zealand

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20050000 2005
8587 Greig, J.D.; Ravel, A. Analysis of foodborne outbreak data reported internationally for source attribution Analysis of foodborne outbreak data reported internationally for source attribution
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.12.031

The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of foodborne outbreak data extracted from publicly available international electronic reports and publications to provide estimates of food attribution,…

The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of foodborne outbreak data extracted from publicly available international electronic reports and publications to provide estimates of food attribution, to derive and compare these estimates between regions, while improving the understanding of the pathogen/food vehicle combination.

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Source: International Journal of Food Microbiology, Vol. 130, No. 2, Mar. 31 2009, p. 77-87.

Keywords:

bacteria, biological hazards, Campylobacter, disease outbreaks, Escherichia coli, food contamination, food pathogens, outbreak investigation, Salmonella, source attribution

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20090331 2009
8586 Ravel, A., et al Exploring Historical Canadian Foodborne Outbreak Data Sets for Human Illness Attribution Exploring Historical Canadian Foodborne Outbreak Data Sets for Human Illness Attribution
URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iafp/jfp/2009/00000072/00000009/art00022

This study was conducted to explore the usefulness of three comprehensive Canadian foodborne outbreak data sets covering 30 years for estimating food attribution in cases of gastrointestinal illness, providing…

This study was conducted to explore the usefulness of three comprehensive Canadian foodborne outbreak data sets covering 30 years for estimating food attribution in cases of gastrointestinal illness, providing Canadian food attribution estimates from a historical perspective.

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Source: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 72, No. 9, Sep. 2009, p. 1963-1976.

Keywords:

bacteria, biological hazards, Canada, Clostridium, disease outbreaks, Escherichia coli, food pathogens, foodborne illness, human health, infection, outbreak investigation, source attribution

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20090900 2009
8561 Little, C.L., et al Attribution of Human Listeria monocytogenes Infections in England and Wales to Ready-to-Eat Food Sources Placed on the Market: Adaptation of the Hald Salmonella Source Attribution Model Attribution of Human Listeria monocytogenes Infections in England and Wales to Ready-to-Eat Food Sources Placed on the Market: Adaptation of the Hald Salmonella Source Attribution Model
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2009.0439

Here, the authors adapted and applied the Hald model to L. monocytogenes to determine whether such an approach may provide further insight and quantify the relative importance of food…

Here, the authors adapted and applied the Hald model to L. monocytogenes to determine whether such an approach may provide further insight and quantify the relative importance of food sources to listeriosis cases, including risk population groups such as the elderly.

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Source: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, Vol. 7, No. 7, Jul. 4, 2010, p. 749-56.

Keywords:

at-risk population, immunocompromised population, Listeria, Listeria monocytogenes, models, ready-to-eat foods, Salmonella, source attribution

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20100704 2010
8464 Pires, S.M.; Hald, T. Assessing the Differences in Public Health Impact of Salmonella Subtypes Using a Bayesian Microbial Subtyping Approach for Source Attribution. Assessing the Differences in Public Health Impact of Salmonella Subtypes Using a Bayesian Microbial Subtyping Approach for Source Attribution.
URL: http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2009.0369

In this article, the investigators develop a Bayesian model that attributes illness to specific sources and allows for a better estimation of the differences in the ability of Salmonella…

In this article, the investigators develop a Bayesian model that attributes illness to specific sources and allows for a better estimation of the differences in the ability of Salmonella subtypes and food types to result in reported salmonellosis. The model accommodates data for multiple years and is based on the Danish Salmonella surveillance.

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Source: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, Vol. 7, No. 2, Feb. 2010, p.143-151.

Keywords:

Bayesian theory, food pathogens, foodborne illness, methodology, monitoring, risk assessment, Salmonella

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20100200 2010
8078 Pires, S.M.; Evers, E.G.; van Pelt, W.; Ayers, T.; Scallan, E.; Angulo, F.J.; Havelaar, A.; Hald, T. Attributing the Human Disease Burden of Foodborne Infections to Specific Sources Attributing the Human Disease Burden of Foodborne Infections to Specific Sources
URL: http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2008.0208
In this review, the authors propose harmonized nomenclature, and describe the various approaches for human illness source attribution and their usefulness to address specific public health.
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Source: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. Vol. 6, No. 4, May 2009, p. 417-424.

Keywords:

burden of disease, foodborne illness, human health, infection, public health, source attribution, zoonoses

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20090505 2009
8007 Mullner, P.; Jones, G.; Noble, A.; Spencer, S.E.F.; Hathaway, S.; French, N.P. Source Attribution of Food-Borne Zoonoses in New Zealand: A Modified Hald Model Source Attribution of Food-Borne Zoonoses in New Zealand: A Modified Hald Model
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2009.01224.x

A Bayesian approach was developed by Hald et al. to estimate the contribution of different food sources to the burden of human salmonellosis in Denmark. This article describes the…

A Bayesian approach was developed by Hald et al. to estimate the contribution of different food sources to the burden of human salmonellosis in Denmark. This article describes the development of several modifications that can be used to adapt the model to different countries and pathogens.

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Source: Risk Analysis, Vol. 29, No. 7, Mar. 30 2009, p. 970-984.

Keywords:

burden of disease, Campylobacter, microbiological risk assessment, models, Salmonella, source attribution, zoonoses

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20090330 2009
7517 Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards, European Food Safety Authority Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment on Salmonella in Meat: Source Attribution for Human Salmonellosis from Meat - Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Biological Hazards A Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment on Salmonella in Meat: Source Attribution for Human Salmonellosis from Meat - Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Biological Hazards
URL: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/efsa_locale-1178620753812_1178686062644.htm

Opinion adopted on January 24, 2008 regarding the quantitative risk assessment and evaluation of the relative contribution of different meat categories to cases of food-borne Salmonella infections in humans,…

Opinion adopted on January 24, 2008 regarding the quantitative risk assessment and evaluation of the relative contribution of different meat categories to cases of food-borne Salmonella infections in humans, taking into account the occurrence of the pathogen in the food chain, risk factors, food production flows and food preparation and consumption habits.

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Source: The EFSA Journal, No. 625, 2008, p. 1-32.

Keywords:

beef, exposure assessment, lambs, meat, methodology, pork, poultry, risk assessment, ruminants, safety assessment, Salmonella, swine

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20080218 2008
5974 Batz, M.B., et al. Linking Illness to Food: Summary of a Workshop on Food Attribution Linking Illness to Food: Summary of a Workshop on Food Attribution
URL: http://www.rff.org/rff/documents/fsrc-dp-02.pdf
Report from a workshop held October 2003 in Atlanta, GA. Includes discussion of food categorization, current approaches to food attribution, and future options
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Source: Food Safety Research Consortium

Keywords:

risk analysis

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20041100 2004